Riding Gear Review - XPD VR 6.2 Riding Boots

Riding Gear Review - XPD VR 6.2 Riding Boots

Snapshot: We recently got our hands on with the mid-range boots from the Italian manufacturer Spidi’s shoe range branded as XPD. While given a choice to choose from anywhere in the range, between the top of the line XP5-S and all the way down to entry level X-Zero, we went with the mid-range full length XPD VR6 Boot.

We cannot stress the importance of riding gear while on the roads. Regardless if you are going for a long ride or for a quick weekend blast, every situation demands a good set of riding gear to protect you incase the unthinkable happens. We recently got our hands on with the mid-range boots from the Italian manufacturer Spidi’s shoe range branded as XPD. While given a choice to choose from anywhere in the range, between the top of the line XP5-S and all the way down to entry level X-Zero, we went with the mid-range full length XPD VR6 Boot. 

The VR6 boot lies bang in the middle of the XPD food chain. A very comfortable and lightweight shoe for hybrid usage, the VR6 is quite a capable shoe for the streets and weekend rides but it also provides ample re-enforcement and ample amounts of protection even for occasional track use.

Anything above the mid-range full size boot makes them too track focused and a bit uneasy for regular street riding as well as weekend rides. I am glad to say that the VR46 places itself bang in the middle, proving to be a versatile show at the same time great bang for the buck.

To start off, compared to some of the other shoes in the same price range, the VR46 feel incredibly lightweight and are very easy to slide into. The outer construction consists of a synthetic leather base with strong TPU shift interface panel at the front to protect damage from the gear shifter, which tapers all the way into the PU sliders that are replaceable. To keep the foot movement free and comfortable even on long journeys there is an elasticized bellow below the shin plate to give flexibility without sacrificing on any safety.

Further to protect the ankle, there is a PU slider incorporated over the Talus area and aggressively styled TPU protection that is also ventilated at the back to cover the ankle and heel bone from serious damage in case of a crash. Moving on to the top, the shin armor is probably one of the largest that can be found on a boot of this price, while being ventilated to keep the insides dry and airy even after a long day or riding. Finally, at the top, the VR6 comes with a stretchable membrane at the top, a feature that comes on much higher end boots, that allows easy movement of the foot while operating the brakes and gear shifter on the motorcycle. 

On the inside, the VR46 comes with a full mesh lining that acts doubly as an insulator as well as a air pressure zone that allows cold air to pass through all the way to the inside of the boots while seamlessly retaining heat inside the lining during cold temperatures.  

Till date, my riding boots experience has been pretty scruffy, most of the boots that I have tried are quite hard and unreasonably stiff, making it difficult to shift and offer quite a numb feeling while riding over the rear brake pedals. The XPD VR6 have been a welcome change in that case, sporting a lightweight third-party skywalk sole, the boots one of the easiest to get used to straight off the shelf. While it does take a bit to get used to, the learning curve and running-in time on the XPD VR6 is much lesser than any other boot in the same range or even higher. 

Our Rating : 4/5

We believe you love your hands as much as you love your feet, dont' you? 

 

•  riding gear
on 2014-10-31 01:33:57

We think you'd like...